Terminal A. Detroit, MI

Terminal A. Detroit, MI

Dawn. Logan International Airport. Boston, MA

Dawn. Logan International Airport. Boston, MA

Union Oyster House. Boston, MA

Union Oyster House. Boston, MA

Prospect Hill. Somerville, MA

Prospect Hill. Somerville, MA

Easter Evening. Somerville, MA

Easter Evening. Somerville, MA

We up here.

We up here.

Travel reading. Always.

Travel reading. Always.

Saturday Night Live: Nickelodeon Show

One of the better SNL sketches that I’ve seen in awhile. AND IT DIDN’T EVEN AIR!

"The dog is a gentleman; I hope to go to his heaven not man’s." -Mark Twain. 
RIP Cowboy. May there be many bones and Gatorade bottles and pastures for you to enjoy.

"The dog is a gentleman; I hope to go to his heaven not man’s." -Mark Twain.
RIP Cowboy. May there be many bones and Gatorade bottles and pastures for you to enjoy.

James Gandolfini's Swan Song

You know, it’s fitting that James Gandolfini’s final film is set in an area where Tony Soprano made his name known. 

Just across the Hudson and East Rivers, in Brooklyn, we find Marv, a middle-aged bar owner (well former bar owner he says, but not willingly). As we watch the trailer, we find out that Cousin Marvs — Marv’s former bar — is an informal bank. Money comes in, it’s placed in a dropbox under the bar counter, someone picks it up. Simple.

The conflict is easy to predict; the bar is robbed, and now it’s up to Marv and his bartender — and money handler — Bob (played by Tom Hardy) to find out who has it. 

I’ve been a huge fan of Gandolfini’s work. Being in an Italian family, Sundays in the 2000s consisted of two things: big family dinners and The Sopranos. It was then I was introduced to Tony… I mean James.

His roles in the latter part of his life all had their quirks. The CIA Director in Zero Dark Thirty. Albert in Enough Said. Mickey in Killing Them Softly. The voice of Carol in Where the Wild Things Are.

He didn’t decide these roles to show audiences he was more than just Tony Soprano; he didn’t need to. This scene in the Sopranos shows you he was more than the mobster audiences thought he was. He knew characters so well that their authenticity was never questioned. Whenever my parents saw him on TV, they’d never said “That’s James Gandolfini!” They’d say, “That’s Tony Soprano!”

Combined with a great script from Mystic River writer Dennis Lehane, Gandolfini gives us one last chance to see his gift.

Well that, and showing us one last glimpse of Tony Soprano.